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The 12 Steps

For Freedom from Addictive Behaviors

Steps 1 - 3 ... Out of Despair Find Hope


We admitted we were powerless over our addiction - that our lives had become unmanageable
Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity
Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood God

Steps 4 - 7 ... "Clean House" by Taking Inventory

Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves
Admitted to God, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs
Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character
Humbly asked God to remove our shortcomings

Steps 8 - 9 ... "Clean House" by Making Amends


Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all
Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others

Steps 10 - 12 ... Continue "Cleaning" & Help Others


Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it
Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood God, praying only for knowledge of God's will for us and the power to carry that out
Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to other addicts, and to practice these principles in all our affairs

About the 12 Step Program

Twelve Step programs are well known for their use in treating addictive and dysfunctional behaviors. The first 12 step program began with Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) in the 1930s and has since grown to be the most widely used approach in dealing not only with recovery from alcoholism, but also from drug abuse and various other addictive and dysfunctional behaviors.

The first book written to cover the 12 step program was titled "Alcoholics Anonymous", affectionately known as the Big Book by program members. Following the subsequent extensive growth of twelve step programs for other addictive and dysfunctional behaviors, many additional books were written and recordings and videos were produced. These cover the steps in greater detail and how people have specifically applied the steps in their lives. An extensive chronology and background about the history of A.A. has been put together at Dick B.'s website.

The twelve steps of the program are listed above and on the steps page in generic form. Other groups who have adopted the 12 steps to address their own particular addictive or dysfunctional behavior have similar ideas, usually with only minor variations. These steps are meant to be worked sequentially as a process of getting rid of addictive behaviors and should result in a growth in freedom and happiness, as outlined in the Promises. The general governing approach for A.A. groups was originally laid out in the Twelve Traditions, and they remain the guiding principles for most 12 step groups today.

There is a wealth of further information about 12 Step programs in Wikipedia, including a list of 12 step groups, and also from the numerous links in our directory of recovery related websites.

Addiction Overcoming Self Injury

Overcoming Self Injury

Resources about overcoming self-injury to our body
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CoolNurse on Self-Injury

★★★★www.coolnurse.com/self-injury.htm

CoolNurse on Self-Injury Overview of Self-Injury with some advice for dealing with it.

Obsessive Skin Pickers Anonymous (OSPA)

1241 El Portal Street, Tracy, CA, USA
www.stoppickingonme.com

Obsessive Skin Pickers Anonymous (OSPA) OSPA is a fellowship of people who share their experience, strength, and hope to recover from obsessive or compulsive skinpicking and related disorders, such as hair-pulling and nail biting. All are welcome. You are not alone, and you are not crazy! Jo ...

Telephone209-298-0345
E-mail

Self Mutilators Anonymous

www.selfmutilatorsanonymous.org

Self Mutilators Anonymous Self Mutilators Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength, and hope with each other, that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from physical self-mutilation. They meet twice a week in New ...

Self-Injury Community at HealthyPlaces.com

★★★★www.healthyplace.com/Communities/self_injury/Site/index.htm

Self-Injury Community at HealthyPlaces.com Features chat rooms, forums, associated journals/blogs and some sub-sites like http://www.healthyplace.com/Communities/Self_Injury/healingtouch/index.html - A Healing Touch http://www.healthyplace.com/Communities/Self_Injury/bloodred/index.html - B ...

Self-injury.net

www.self-injury.net

Self-injury.net Site built by Gabrielle, who has done S.I. Site contains chat room (seems fairly active), all sorts of quotes, pictures, polls, writings, an excellent set of links and other resources. See their sitemap for the full listing of features.

TeensHealth on Cutting

★★★★www.kidshealth.org/teen/your_mind/feeling_sad/cutting.html

TeensHealth on Cutting Articles and references about cutting from the KidsHealth/TeensHealth web site. Explanation of what it is, how to deal with it and where to get help.

Web Ring Dealing with Self-Injury

u.webring.com/hub?ring=311xacto

Web Ring Dealing with Self-Injury A Web-ring is a list of sites that all deal with a similar issues. This web ring is a list of sites dealing with self-injury.